Signature Leadership Principles

/Signature Leadership Principles
  1. ORGANIZATIONAL ALIGNMENT
    Performance management is a reflection of the vision, mission, and values of the organization as the leader guides employees’ efforts in the achievement of goals related to strategic initiatives.
  2. HUMAN AND BUSINESS ELEMENTS
    Managing others is more than attending to the business at hand. Leaders bring their whole humanity to the workplace, demonstrating care, concern, and integrity in the workplace for others to follow their lead. When leaders set a positive example of leading with both heart and mind, teams can achieve stellar results.
  3. INTENT VERSUS IMPACT OF BEHAVIOR
    Individuals tend to judge others’ behavior on the impact (positive or negative) of their actions, yet explain their own own behavior by their intention. Leaders act in ways that generate positive impact without need for explaining or defending their intentions afterwards. Leaders set expectations with employees that performance is measured on both results and behaviors and hold employees accountable accordingly.
  4. POWER OF LANGUAGE TO HURT OR HEAL
    Words have power to stimulate positive or negative emotions, encouraging thoughts and actions accordingly. Leaders choose their words intentionally to demonstrate respect, build trust, and create motivating work environments. Silence sends a strong message to others with an interpretation that is almost always negative. Leaders communicate frequently and follow-up to prevent miscommunication and false rumors. For performance improvement, leaders provide employees with ongoing, timely, and constructive feedback. 
  5. 80/20 RULE TO PREPARE OR REPAIR
    Spending 80% of time available to plan and prepare enables leaders to spend less time (20%) in addressing future problems. Reversing that, spending only 20% of time to plan and prepare will maximize the time spent (80%) to address problems later. Leaders know that their best use of time, energy, effort, and dollars is spent in preparing rather than repairing.
  6. SPOON-FEEDING OR CRITICAL THINKING: DEVELOPING DEPENDENCY OR SELF-RELIANCE
    Give a man a fish, or teach a man to fish for himself? Managers who fail to delegate often point to the ease and higher quality of outcome when doing tasks themselves. The underlying issue is that the manager has failed to grow the leadership bench strength of his team by denying employees the opportunity to learn, grow, or develop skills. Giving employees the answers and telling them how to do things stymies growth, limits performance, and encourages employees to check their initiative and creativity at the door.  Leaders encourage employee self-reliance, initiative, and skill development by asking good questions that surface employee ideas and offer confidence in their abilities.
  7. ENGAGING EMPLOYEE COMMITMENT OR COMPLIANCE
     Leaders who engage the hearts and minds of employees effectively demonstrate their trust, respect and concern for each individual employee. Rather than feeling like just another cog in the wheel or a means to an end, employees need to feel valued and appreciated for the work that they do. When leaders provide employees with a balance of constructive feedback to improve performance and offer praise for positive actions and results, employees know that their contributions are important and valued and will continue to perform accordingly. When leaders fail to praise, employees can feel taken for granted, may disengage from the job, or even leave the organization. Disengaged employees who stay on at the organization, lose their commitment to the job and team, and perform at marginal levels, barely meeting expectations. Higher levels of employee engagement result in higher levels of commitment to the job and organization, and higher performance levels.